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Northern Colorado History & Heritage Events

This list includes as many history talks, tours, and reenactments as we could find. Also included are fundraisers being held by local historical societies, museums, and other history-related organizations.

Though this is the most comprehensive list of history and heritage events available for Northern Colorado, it sometimes happen that an event is missed. If you know of an event that’s not included here, please hop over to our Contact page and send us a note about what’s missing. It also occasionally happens that a typo sneaks its way into the text and a wrong date or time is listed. So we recommend that whenever you find an event that you’d like to attend, please click through on the link provided to get more information directly from the source.

This list is compiled by Meg Dunn who is a member of the Historic Larimer County board. Meg also publishes articles at NorthernColoradoHistory.com and produces this events list as an eNewsletter sent out under the heading of “History Now.” If you would like to receive this list directly to your inbox, sign up here. The newsletter is published around the end of each month. If you’re not seeing it, please check your spam folder.

January History & Heritage Events

Please click through to host pages to confirm time,
date and location of these events.

January 7

Fort Collins: The Fort Collins Historical Society continues its series on “the Eccentric People and Places of Fort Collins and Beyond” with a presentation on the Life of Frank C. Miller, by Jennifer Mayan Kaylor. Jennifer will be sharing Frank C. Miller’s story through photographs that he took as well as several other artifacts that she has found through estate sales, garage sales, and the like. Historical Society meetings are free and open to the public. Come join us at 7 pm, at the Masonic Lodge, 225 W. Oak Street. 


January 11

Fort Collins: The Central Rockies Old Time Music Association (CROMA) is holding an old fashioned Barn Dance at Every Day Joe’s Coffee House, 144 S. Mason St. Door open at 6:30 with dancing from 7 – 10 pm. Come alone or with a partner – this is a great dance for beginners or experts alike. No experience is necessary – all dances are taught before-hand (circles, reels and squares). Admission is $10 each, $25 for families, youth 12 and under are free. 


January 13

Loveland: The Loveland Historical Society presents, “Captain Jepp and the Little Black Book: How Aviation Pioneer Made the Skies Safer for Everyone.” In the early days of aviation, flying was a hazardous business.  Without devices such as radar and radio communication, pilots often got lost or crashed into unseen obstacles.  Elrey B. Jeppesen, began his flying career inOregon during the Roaring Twenties, flying WWI war surplus Jennies as an instructor, a stunt pilot and a barnstormer. He later was an aerial photographer in Mexico, one of the earliest air-mail pilots, and finally was a pilot for the fledgling United Airlines in the 1930s.  But his real claim to fame is a system of aerial navigation which he devised. 7 – 8 pm. Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N Lincoln Ave.


January 16

Fort Collins: Larimer County Genealogical Society Annual Business Meeting and A Common Name Study Case by Carol Stetser. Held at the Good Samaritan Society. Business Meeting: There will be a short business meeting to update the membership. Introduction of the candidates for 2020 Election and call for any nominations from the floor will be made. Also, you will be able to purchase your yearly Society Membership at the meeting.  Please bring cash or check as we will be unable to process your credit card at the meeting. Program Description: One or Two Lily Johnsons: A Common Name Case Study: Common names are one of the biggest challenges to genealogical research, particularly when complete documents are not available. This short case study presents the question of whether two cousins married the same woman or whether there were actually two different women with the same common name. It compares documents supporting both premises and invites the audience to draw their own conclusions as to whether enough information has been gathered to prove one theory or the other. If the study does not present enough evidence to prove one theory, the audience is further invited to suggest additional steps that could be taken to do so. The case study, while short, showcases the steps that might be taken in solving many common name problems. 6:30 – 8:30 pm. 


January 17

Greeley: Beyond Suffrage: 100 Years of Progress exhibit opens at the Greeley Museum, 714 8th Street. Colorado women gained the right to vote in 1893, a full 27 years before the ratification of the 19th Amendment. It was not an easy victory. Unlike Wyoming, suffrage was not written into the constitution when Colorado became a state. Instead, women had to convince the majority of male voters in Colorado to support the cause. But, Colorado women didn’t stop fighting for equality after winning the right to vote. Located in the museum’s West Gallery, visitors can explore the lives and impacts of trailblazing women in Weld County. From engineers and politicians to educators, doctors, and more, these women and their clubs saw a brighter future for women and worked to achieve it. Beyond Suffrage: 100 Years of Progress opens at the Greeley History Museum on January 17, 2020.


January 18

Larimer County: Larimer County’s Second Annual Winter Mixer is coming soon! Location and time to be announced. (We’ve had a tough time finding a location. If you have a suggestion, please email me! meg@northerncoloradohistory.com ) But what’s certain is that we’ll be bringing the Larimer County History Trivia Quiz back, and it’ll be better than ever! So sharpen your history skillz and prepare to duke it out with other history aficionados. Don’t have a clue about local history? No worries. This is your chance to learn something new! This is event is free. Last year we had a potluck with BBQ meat provided by HLC. Stay tuned to hear what the plan is this year. 4 – 7 pm. (January 25th is the backup date in case we have to cancel on the 18th due to the weather).


January 22

Estes Park: The 1917 Book Club hosted by the Estes Park Museum will explore local title, A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains by Isabella Bird. The book explores the travels of Englishwoman Isabella Bird. Light snacks will be provided. This program is free and open to the public. It is strongly encouraged that participants read each book prior to the program to take part in the discussion. No prior registration is required. A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains chronicles the travels and adventures of Isabella Bird including her interactions with James “Rocky Mountain Jim” Nugent and her ascent of Longs Peak. Isabella Lucy Bird (1831-1904) was an English born traveler, writer, and naturalist. Eventually, Ms. Bird became the first woman named Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.  Museum staff will facilitate a lively discussion about the title. 1917 Book Club titles can be purchased at the Museum Gift Shop or Macdonald Bookshop. Additionally, the Estes Valley Library will circulate a limited number of copies, holds can be placed on circulating copies if all are currently checked out. For any questions regarding the event, please call or email, Curator of Interpretation, Mikaela Fundaun at mfundaun@estes.org or 970-577-3762.


January 23

Fort Collins: Be Inspired, Zonta-Style. Local and international women who have overcome obstacles to make a difference in the lives of others will be remembered in a special program from 5-7 pm Thursday, Jan. 23, at the Global Village Museum of Arts and Cultures. Be Inspired, Zonta-Style will be presented by three members of the Zonta Club of Fort Collins, curator of the Museum’s Hall Gallery exhibit, Inspirational Women ~ Rising Through Adversity. Admission to the program is $5/person and includes entry into the Museum’s four galleries. For more information, visit globalvillagemuseum.org or call 970-221-4600. 

Greeley: “Slavery by Another Name” by Jean Messinger is an examination of Reconstruction, Jim Crow, and the challenges Blacks encountered when they migrated North.  The discussion includes examples of less-publicly-acknowledged supremacism and racism. The History Brown Bag series, sponsored by the Greeley Historic Preservation Commission, is held at the Greeley History Museum on the 4th Thursday of the month from January through October of 2020. These presentations are free and open to the public and no reservations are required. To learn more about Greeley’s Historic Preservation Program, please visit greeleygov.com/hp.


January 28

Loveland: Abraham Lincoln and Mysticism will be presented by Paul Flanders. The 16th president of the United States is considered our nation’s finest, yet he was a dark horse to win the Republican nomination and received only 39% of the popular vote. A case can be made that he was a godsend at a time when the fledgling republic needed him most.  Tuesday 1/28 2 – 3:30 $3 sign up through the Loveland Parks & Recreation Activity Guide

February Events – Mark Your Calendar! 

Please click through to host pages to confirm time,
date and location of these events.

February 4

Fort Collins: Join the Fort Collins Historical Society in learning about the notorious Madame Marie Lafitte from Suzy Riding, host of the Forbidden Fort Collins tour. Meetings are held at 7 pm in the Masonic Lodge at 225 W. Oak Street. Meetings are free and open to the public. 


February 8

Fort Collins: The Central Rockies Old Time Music Association (CROMA) is holding an old fashioned Barn Dance at Every Day Joe’s Coffee House, 144 S. Mason St. Door open at 6:30 with dancing from 7 – 10 pm. Come alone or with a partner – this is a great dance for beginners or experts alike. No experience is necessary – all dances are taught before-hand (circles, reels and squares). Admission is $10 each, $25 for families, youth 12 and under are free. 


February 10

LovelandShootout at the Superior Depot: An Episode in the Colorado Labor Wars. Larry Dorsey tells about the shooting and killing of strikebreaker “Dude” Searcy” by theSuperior Town Marshall during the coal miners’ Long Strike of 1910-1914.  It willtake a hard look at coal mining and labor issues, labor unrest and strikes inthe early 1900s.   Free and open to the community.  Loveland Museum/Gallery, 503 N Lincoln Ave. 7 – 8 pm. 


February 11

Fort Collins (or Windsor): Join Historic Larimer County to learn about the archeological digs that have been taking place along Fossil Creek for the past several summers. Jason Labelle, who has lead the digs, will be presenting about the discovery of the site and what has been uncovered since. We’re still looking for a location, preferably in a local brewery with enough room for a group of about 30. Got a suggestion? Please email me, meg@northerncoloradohistory.com


February 27

Loveland: How the 1920’s Roared, by Paul Flanders. Learn how new management, insight and a responsive work force produced the richest country  in the world — and abundance that we take for granted today. As a consequence, America underwent a cultural revolution impacting education, consumer spending, spectator sports, radio, movies, music, and life expectancy. 2 – 3 pm. $3. Sign up  through the Loveland Parks & Rec Activity Guide.

GreeleyGreeley Water Past, Present, and Future, by Harold Evans. Mr. Evans will discuss the history of Greeley Water since 1870, starting with the construction of Union Colony Canal #3.  He will also talk about the future of Greeley Water and what Greeley is doing to supply Greeley’s water needs in 2065. History Brown Bag series, sponsored by the Greeley Historic Preservation Commission, is held at the Greeley History Museum on the 4th Thursday of the month from January through October of 2020. These presentations are free and open to the public and no reservations are required. To learn more about Greeley’s Historic Preservation Program, please visit greeleygov.com/hp.

Fort Collins: History Comes Alive: Rosa Parks. National humanities and Chatauqua scholar Becky Stone will portray Rosa Parks. This courageous and determined woman refused to give up her seat on a bus in 1955 in Alabama, in essence starting the Civil Rights Movement. Professor Stone will also discuss Park’s focus on Women’s Rights as they relate to the Civil Rights Movement. At the Harmony Library in the FRCC Long’s Peak Student Center. 11 am – Noon. 


If you know of any February events that aren’t listed here, please let me know at meg@northerncoloradohistory.com. Thanks!

Contact Us

Historic Larimer County
PO Box 1909
Fort Collins, CO 80522